Venous Insufficiency in Athletes

Venous disease slowing you down? Put a sock on it!

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Tiny Veins, Major Pains

Leg pain can be caused by many things, including dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. One common cause is venous insufficiency. To understand this condition, it is necessary to understand the function of veins. The venous system returns blood to the heart through one-way valves. These valves allow blood to travel toward the heart but stop the blood from moving backward. When these valves fail, blood is allowed to pool in the legs causing symptoms.

Do Your Legs Hurt?

These symptoms include

  • Leg pain or achiness
  • Heaviness in legs
  • Itching around veins
  • Leg Swelling
  • Restless Legs

Over time, venous disease can cause more serious conditions

  • Blood clots
  • Skin pigment changes
  • Bleeding
  • Skin ulcerations

Venous Disease - Athlete Leg Pain

If you’re a professional athlete or weekend warrior, you’ll know how important leg health is to your activity of choice. Leg pain and cramps can hinder your performance or in more extreme cases, completely stop you in your tracks. What you may not realize is that leg pain can often be caused by venous disease

Jessica - Mother and Athlete

“After going to another vein center and having no success, I was referred to Intermountain Vein Center for help. Because of their incredible knowledge, non-invasive and most current types of treatment, and dedication to my overall health, I am back to running better than ever, and I can even wear shorts without being embarrassed. I finally have my life back and am almost completely pain free!”

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Dr. Hatch - Our Weekend Warrior

“I have been active all my life. My wife is a competitive runner and I am a casual runner. When I got into my mid 30’s I began experiencing cramping in my calves after running just a short distance. I tried everything to fix this problem but without relief. Goo, tablets, hydration, stretching etc. but nothing helped. Being one of the doctors who treat vein disease at the Intermountain Vein Center, and after treating a few patients who are runners and who were experiencing the same cramping problem as myself, it hit me. I have venous insufficiency or vein disease too! I started wearing compression stockings and my cramping problem went away immediately. I then had a full work up and found the incompetent veins in both calves and had them treated. I can now run freely without the annoying cramping problem. I also never run or bike without my compression socks. I enjoy running again thanks to compression therapy and vein treatment.”

How is Venous Disease Treated?

Treatment is typically accomplished with a combination of minimally invasive procedures. These treatments are performed in-office and generally take 1-2 hours to complete. Patients are offered a relaxant medication such as Valium or nitrous oxide. After the procedure, patients are able to resume most daily activities, but are advised to refrain from strenuous exercise for one week.

Treatment options include

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Leg pain - Put a sock on it!

Sport compression socks are gaining a lot of traction with athletes around the globe. They can be seen on the legs of basketball players, Olympians, marathon runners, and the weekend warriors. These stockings ,often colorful, are designed to improve performance, endurance and speed recovery. They can also help alleviate the symptoms of venous disease.

Calling On All Weekend Warriors

Not everyone can keep up with Usain Bolt or Stephen Curry, but every athlete deserves top performance. If vein disease is slowing you down, Intermountain Vein Center is here to help you achieve optimal activity. Call us at 801.379.6700, tell us you are a Weekend Warrior, and receive a complimentary free ultrasound screening.

Join Us for our Free Screening Event!

  • August 26th 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • 1055 North 300 West Suite 308
  • Provo, Utah

Schedule a free ultrasound screening today!

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